Article written by Diabetic Sock Club an American owned small business
focused on the health benefits of proper foot care for those living with diabetes.

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The Best Sock Aids For Compression Stockings, Diabetic Socks, Seniors, & More

Having diabetes comes with many issues and complications that can decrease one's quality of life. One of the complications that most people with diabetes experience is having problems with their mobility.

Type 2 diabetes, a prevalent metabolic condition in the elderly, is a leading cause of functional limitations, reduced mobility, and loss of independence. The pathophysiology of applicable restriction and disability in older persons is complex and multifactorial. Several potential routes include cardiovascular illness, peripheral neuropathy, obesity, osteoarthritis, visual impairment, and cognitive impairment, more common in diabetic patients.


How Does Diabetes Affect Mobility

According to the National Library of Medicine, Skeletal muscle impairment affects many older people with type 2 diabetes, resulting in decreased muscular strength and physical function, according to new research. Insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, muscle fat infiltration, and peripheral neuropathies are the essential physiologic factors that cause muscular weakness in people with diabetes. The existing evidence on the molecular processes causing skeletal muscle failure in type 2 diabetes is summarized in this review, examining the role of muscle strength and quality in the diabetes-mobility impairment relationship.


Other Diseases That Affects Mobility

  • Sclerosis - Hardening of the skin in specific areas. Underlying illnesses, including diabetes and scleroderma, are common causes of sclerosis. The treatment is targeted at the source of the problem.
  • Parkinson's disease - Parkinson's disease is a neurological condition that causes tremors, stiffness, and difficulty walking, balancing, and coordinating. Symptoms of Parkinson's disease typically appear gradually and worsen over time. People with Parkinson's disease may have problems walking and speaking as the disease develops. They may also have mental and behavioral changes, sleep issues, depression, memory problems, and exhaustion.
  • Stroke - When the blood flow to a region of your brain is blocked or diminished, brain tissue is deprived of oxygen and nutrients, resulting in a stroke. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. A stroke is a medical emergency that requires immediate attention. Brain injury and other complications can be avoided if intervention is taken early. The good news is that stroke deaths in the United States have decreased dramatically in recent years. Effective treatments can also help to avoid stroke impairment.
  • Traumatic brain or spine injuries - A traumatic brain injury (TBI) disrupts the brain's normal function caused by a blow to the head, a jolt to the head, or a penetrating head injury. While anybody can have a TBI, children and the elderly are particularly vulnerable. Damage to the spinal cord is referred to as a spinal cord injury (SCI). SCI can cause a loss of sensory function or motor control of the arms, legs, or body, partial or complete. In severe cases, SCI can impact bladder and bowel control, respiration, heart rate, and blood pressure.
  • Congenital abnormalities - Congenital anomalies are morphological or functional abnormalities that develop during pregnancy. These illnesses, sometimes known as congenital disabilities, genetic disorders, or congenital abnormalities, arise during pregnancy and can be detected before or after birth or later in life. Approximately 6% of babies are born with a genetic abnormality, resulting in thousands of fatalities worldwide. However, because statistics rarely include aborted pregnancies and stillbirths, the correct number of occurrences could be significantly higher. Cleft lip and palate, clubfoot, and hernias are examples of congenital disabilities that can be corrected surgically or non-surgically. Heart problems, neural tube anomalies, and down syndrome, for instance, can have long-term consequences.
  • Obesity - Obesity is a complicated condition characterized by excess body fat. Obesity is more than a cosmetic issue. It's a medical condition that raises your risk of developing other diseases and health issues like heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, and malignancies. There are a variety of reasons why some people struggle to lose weight. Obesity is usually caused by a combination of genetic, physiological, and environmental variables and dietary, physical activity, and exercise decisions.
  • Arthritis - Arthritis is when one or more joints enlarge and become tender. Joint pain and stiffness are the most common symptoms of arthritis, which generally worsen with age. Osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis are the two most frequent kinds of arthritis. Cartilage — the firm, slippery tissue that covers the ends of bones where they form a joint — breaks down due to osteoarthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis is when the body's immune system destroys the joints, starting with the joint lining.
  • Lower limb ischemia - A severe blockage in the arteries of the lower limbs causes critical limb ischemia (CLI), which significantly lowers blood flow. It's an effective PAD form, but it's less common than claudication.
  • Lung and balance disorders - Lung disease can have far-reaching consequences that go beyond your ability to breathe. Shortness of breath is a symptom of COPD and other chronic respiratory conditions. You will feel dizzy, weak, and tired due to this. Breathing problems diminish oxygen levels in the blood, impairing your body's capacity to function normally. If you have COPD or another type of lung disease, you're more likely to lose your balance, fall, or even pass out.

Remedies

  • According to World Physiotherapy, physiotherapy focuses on human function and movement. The areas of promotion, prevention, treatment/intervention, habilitation, and rehabilitation are concerned with finding and maximizing quality of life and mobility potential. Physiotherapy can aid by enhancing and improving the individual's level of mobility using several physiotherapeutic treatments. 
  • Staying active - Perform cardiovascular exercises, strength training exercises, flexibility exercises.
  • Check glucose levels regularly - Your healthcare provider will instruct you on checking your blood glucose level and when to do so. People who take insulin, have trouble controlling blood glucose levels, and experience hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) should monitor their blood glucose levels frequently. When taking diabetic medications, older persons with diabetes are at a higher risk of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), making it even more vital to monitor your glucose levels. Confusion, dizziness, hunger, and sweating are all signs of hypoglycemia.
  • Take medication on time - It's easy to lose track of whether or not you've taken your diabetes medication. Fortunately, there are numerous ways to manage your medicines (such as using a pillbox) as well as alarms that you can set on your phone, computer, watch, or clock to remind you to take your medication. You can also use a chart to track how often you take your medicine.
  • Get blood pressure and cholesterol levels checked regularly - Talk to your doctor about quitting smoking and regulating your blood pressure and cholesterol levels to lower your risk of heart disease and stroke.
  • Examine your feet every day - Make a habit of checking your feet for cuts or signs of infection daily. If you have problems seeing your feet, use a mirror or ask a family member to assist you. If you notice a cut or a red patch that appears to be infected, contact your healthcare provider right once. Keep your feet clean, apply moisturizer to prevent dryness, and wear shoes that won't cause blisters.
  • Keeping a healthy weight and a healthy diet - It's simply easier to move around without carrying extra weight, and bones and joints are less stressed. This is crucial at any age, but weight disorders can have a particularly negative impact on seniors.
  • Hearing Tests - Hearing allows us to track our changing position dynamically over space and time and know where we are concerned with important events and things in our surroundings. Self-motion perception utilizes auditory signals in conjunction with other sensory inputs (visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive) to help us detect our movements across space. Audition can provide unique and significant information to maximize self-motion perception and, as a result, support safe mobility, whether we're standing, walking, or driving. Make an appointment with your doctor to have your hearing tested.
  • Asking a doctor about walking aids - A cane or walker can be used by persons who are a little shaky on their feet. A doctor or physical therapist can recommend specific forms and styles. They can also change the height of the walking aid and make sure it's being utilized correctly.

Best Items To Help With Mobility Issues Caused By Diabetes

  1. DSC Diabetic Socks - Diabetic socks of high quality are manufactured from a combination of comfortable and durable materials. Diabetic socks are created with as few seams as possible and made from lovely and breathable fabrics. Seams can irritate and generate pressure points on delicate diabetic feet; hence the number of seams in diabetic socks should be kept minimum. The length and width of several of these socks would vary. And the size disparity serves a variety of purposes.
  • Soft and wide socks are advised for people with diabetes, circulatory issues, edema, and neuropathy.
  • Ankle socks are made specifically for diabetes people and are contoured to fit their ankles, providing comfort throughout the day.
  • Crew socks - These cushioned socks are meant to assist in avoiding harm to the feet and lower legs when participating in foot-friendly physical activities.
  • Light compression socks are meant to provide relief for weary and hurting feet and legs.
  1. DSC Sock Aid Slider Kit (Easy On, Easy Off) - A sock cradle and a long handle are included in the DSC Sock Aid Slider Kit (Easy On, Easy Off), which allows you to put your socks on without bending, twisting, or turning. The handle will also help you remove your socks once you've finished wearing them and keep your shoes in place as you put them on. This method works with various socks, including formal socks, casual socks, athletic socks, compression socks, and diabetic socks.
  • SOCK SLIDER: The quick and easy way to put on and take off your socks.
  • EASY TO USE: Place your sock on the cradle, lower it to the floor, and slide your foot inside.
  • PERFECT FOR: Those with mobility challenges, injuries, or expecting a child.
  • VERSATILE: Fits a wide range of socks (Dress, Casual, Athletic, and Compression) and may also be used as a shoehorn.
  • COMPACT: For storage and travel, it folds up easily. Handle with a shoehorn attachment

Super Easy To Use:

  • Step 1: Roll the cuff down the sides of the cradle until the toe is at the top, placing your sock heel-side down in the Sock Slider System.
  • Step 2: Use the handle to gently drop the Sock Slider System to the floor once the sock is in place.
  • Step 3: Slide your heel to the bottom of the sock cradle and slowly move your foot into the sock opening until the sock is entirely on your foot. Use the handle to secure the cradle of the Sock Slider System if necessary.

Here are genuine reviews from people who use this sock aid:

  • "This sock aid is one of the best purchases I have made online in a while. My partner uses it post-surgery to avoid bending and twisting, and I use it to put my socks on which I have struggling with for a while. It is sturdy, easy to use and a great value for the money"
  • "I got this for my 84 year old Mom. She has difficulty stooping low enough to put on her socks and she cannot cross her leg over her knee either. This works really good, sand she has no trouble now!"
  • "Easy to use and the sock removal tool is the icing on the cake. Excellent product! The only thing I would suggest is giving your feet plenty of time to dry if using it right after getting out of the shower as some extra effort is required if your feet are wet. Other then that the product is amazing!"

Conclusion

All these inventions are made to ease the usual burdens of a person with mobility issues, so it only makes sense that they use them as much as they need them. There is no shame in using these items, especially if you will be regaining the quality of life you deserve. Along with the support of your doctors and health professionals, your family and friends, continue to keep striving for the best versions of yourselves.

3 comments

  • Do you have a size chart for men vs woman? How do I know what size to buy? I did not see one on your website

    Trudy
  • Do you have a size chart for men vs women ?

    Trudy
  • No instructions on the sock aid kit. Could put 2 pieces together fine but not sure where to place the long on to attach

    Donna Barnhart

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