How to reduce ceramides for diabetics – DIABETIC SOCK CLUB

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How to reduce ceramides for diabetics

Many of us are familiar with diabetes. Diabetes is a chronic medical illness that impacts how your body uses food for energy. Blood glucose (or blood sugar) levels are increased in this long-term metabolic condition, which over time, causes significant harm to the heart, blood vessels, eyes, kidneys, and nerves.


The World Health Organization estimates that 422 million people worldwide have diabetes, which is responsible for 1.5 million annual fatalities. Over the past few decades, there has been a consistent rise in both the incidence and prevalence of diabetes. To reduce the growth in diabetes rates, it is crucial to understand what causes someone to develop diabetes.


According to the University of Utah, there are some reasons why diabetes rates are increasing. First, people often consume more calories and spend more time sitting down. Second, some aspects of our genetic make-up raise our chance of getting diabetes. These modifications influence our metabolism or how our body converts food into energy. A significant component of the metabolic shift is causing the rise in diabetes – ceramides.


Ceramides, a subclass of sphingolipids, have drawn more attention recently due to their involvement in numerous pathophysiologic pathways. They have an increasingly significant role in diabetes and obesity.



Introducing ceramides


Ceramides are members of sphingolipids. They are essential bioactive lipids composed of fatty acid and a long-chain (called sphingoid) base. Ceramides can be stored in the liver, muscles, and adipose tissue. They are particularly abundant within the epidermis of the skin and the white fatty substance that is often visible on the surface of the skin of newborn infants. The ability of the skin to repel water is due to ceramides.



Understanding the importance of ceramides


Ceramides are one of the many different lipids or fats in our cells. Ceramides and other lipids play crucial roles in the body. They play a significant role in the design of cell membranes. They act as signaling molecules and participate in various cellular processes, such as cell growth, proliferation, degradation, and others.


Ceramides can also be found on skin tissue, which, together with other fatty acids, serve dual purposes in creating a protective barrier. Avoiding excessive water loss prevents pathogenic bacteria from entering the body, and internal hydration is preserved. If you look at the label of moisturizer products and lotion, ceramide will likely be listed as an ingredient. 


We need ceramides for our bodies. We have too much of a good thing, which is the problem. When someone gains weight, their muscle cells have excessive quantities of ceramide. In response, it starts to tear mitochondria apart. Mitochondria perform less effectively while they are being torn apart. What was once a connected network is now a single, unique mitochondrion. As a result, obese people have decreased metabolic rates in their muscles.




Ceramides and diabetes: a linkage


Ceramides play a vital function in cell signaling and serve as the intermediaries between extracellular signals and intracellular metabolism, which is particularly significant in the pathogenesis of diabetes. They control cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, and adhesion and are essential in driving apoptosis and cell senescence.


Diabetes development and high ceramide levels have been consistently linked. Ceramide accumulation in muscles and elevated plasma ceramide levels are typical in people with diabetes, especially those who are overweight and have insulin resistance. 


The excess level of ceramides affects insulin signaling and transmission. The pancreas secretes the hormone insulin, which helps cells absorb blood glucose. When insulin is lacking, glucose builds up in the blood and raises blood sugar levels.


Accumulated ceramides suppressed a protein kinase called Akt/PKB, an enzyme involved in the insulin signaling pathway. This negatively impacts glucose uptake and metabolism, increasing the risk of developing insulin resistance. This can eventually cause high blood glucose levels, the establishment of Type 2 diabetes, and other related medical conditions.



Reducing Ceramides


Reducing ceramide levels is a top concern for those with diabetes and insulin resistance, as science demonstrates the dangers of excessive ceramide levels for one's health. Here's the time-tested strategy of diet and exercise.


Exercise


Exercise is beneficial at lowering ceramides, despite not sounding like much fun. A study stated that regular exercise reduces ceramide levels in individuals with obesity, diabetes, or hyperlipidemia.


Additionally, a 2006 research study looked at the effects of endurance exercise on muscle fatty acid metabolism regarding glucose tolerance. The participants underwent eight weeks of moderate-intensity exercise and were overweight. Researchers discovered that training increased glucose tolerance, and 42% fewer total ceramides were produced!


  • Exercise improves insulin sensitivity.

It has also been proven that exercise enhances insulin sensitivity. This can help counteract the harmful effects of ceramide buildup and stop the onset of insulin resistance.


  • Quick and simple workouts

We know that it can be challenging for those with diabetes to find the motivation or the time to exercise. But regardless of the cause, it is crucial to get moving. The good news is that you can start with various easy, short, yet efficient workouts.


Walking is an excellent choice if you're not extremely active or have mobility concerns. You can burn many calories and do stationary squats or rocket leaps anyplace.


And a fantastic approach to ease into strength training and muscle growth is incorporating resistance bands into your activities.


Whole Foods


Along with exercise, you may also follow a diet that can reduce weight gain from increased body fat.


A diet of whole foods and limited calories can aid in weight loss. Choosing whole foods over highly refined foods—like fruit and vegetables—helped reduce specific ceramides.


Sulforaphane is a compound found in cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, cabbage, and brussels sprouts that increases the blood's ability to absorb glucose.


According to this 2019 study, sulforaphane has been found to inhibit an enzyme necessary for forming ceramides, increasing insulin sensitivity.


Monitor Your Calorie and Carb Intake


Diabetes and carbs can be challenging to manage, but happily, there are many low-carb whole foods to pick from. Keeping a close watch on your carbohydrate intake is essential for people with diabetes for glycemic control.


Calorie restriction is also essential in preventing unwanted weight gain. Portion control effectively limits calories, and the diabetes plate method is an easy, visual way to portion meals.


New Treatments


Medical interventions to reduce or control ceramides directly are the subject of increasing numbers of research. According to Medical News Today, statin therapy reduces ceramide levels and lowers cholesterol in the blood. The medications do not, however, stop the body from producing ceramides. Instead, they lessen the creation of lipoproteins, the molecules responsible for transporting them through the bloodstream.


Although research is still looking into these different strategies, there are no known therapies for diabetes that lower ceramides at this time.

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