Can you overuse compression stockings? – DIABETIC SOCK CLUB

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Can you overuse compression stockings?

Can you overuse compression stockings?


Compression stockings are a well-liked remedy for tired legs and calf swelling, although they can be used excessively. Additionally, compression stockings address medical disorders that impact the veins or blood flow in your legs. Long-distance runners, older persons, and people who work standing up can all benefit from them. But when worn improperly, compression stockings can be hazardous. Overusing and wearing compression stockings inappropriately can cause skin damage and infection. It is excessive to wear the same pair of compression stockings for days on end. It would be best to discuss the recommended wear time for addressing your symptoms with your healthcare physician.


It is crucial to have many pairs of compression stockings to wash the ones you've already worn and use the additional team. You engage in numerous activities while wearing compression stockings during the day, which causes the stockings to become dirty. This is unhealthy for your feet, especially if you have significant issues like neuropathy. If you lose feeling in your feet, you might not be aware that you have a wound or scar; dirt could infect it and worsen it. Dirt can also help diseases grow in your feet.



According to numerous studies and articles, compression stockings can significantly lower your risk of injury and muscle cramping while you exercise, especially when you're jogging. But that doesn't mean you should continue using the same pair after you've finished. Because this type of activity makes you sweat and is typically performed outside for added safety and protection, you should have a couple of compression stockings that you'll only wear for this activity and a different team for the rest of the day. Compression stockings and stockings will last longer if used and cared for properly. To make the most of your compression stockings, use the following advice:


  • Washing instructions

- Daily washing is ideal, but at least every two days is recommended. The garment regains its elasticity after being washed, ensuring that you receive the optimum compression and preventing them from rolling.

- Make use of ordinary, unflavored mild detergents. Workable is dish soap. The tiny fibers of the compression stockings can become damaged by harsh chemicals.

Ideally, wash by hand. When using a machine, it must be set to the gentle cycle.


  • Drying instructions

- After washing, place stockings on a soft towel and gently roll to squeeze out excess water.

- Layover vents or loosely hang to dry

- Compression clothing should never be put in the dryer. The dryer's heated atmosphere can weaken the fabric and cause it to lose its compression qualities.


  • Putting on your stockings

- When putting on socks or stockings, rubber gloves should be worn.

Use the "heel pocket out" technique when putting on the stockings.

- To eliminate creases and distribute the compression uniformly, wear gloves.

- When wearing knee-highs, leave two finger widths between the top of the sock and the knee.


When should you not wear compression stockings?


When the peripheral vascular disease affects your lower extremities, you shouldn't wear compression stockings or any compression hosiery. Compression stocking pressure has the potential to exacerbate the ischemic disease. When you have untreated, deep vein thrombosis, phlebitis, or uncompensated organ failure (heart, liver, or kidney), compression therapy should not be used as well. Severe arterial disease unless a vascular surgeon or doctor orders it. According to one paper that covered the subject, the main contraindications for wearing compression stockings include:

  • Severe peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD).
  • Severe cardiac insufficiency.
  • Severe diabetic microangiopathy and neuropathy.

Compression stockings may significantly reduce blood flow into the leg in people with severe peripheral artery disease (PAD). Venous ulcers, open lesions on the legs caused by blood that flows poorly out of the portion, are frequently treated using compression stockings. However, it may be challenging for some patients with wounds to obtain compression socks or stockings over bandages and dressings. Therefore the medical staff may decide on a different type of compression garment. Be aware that wearing compression socks or stockings might be unhealthy and harmful in the following situations:


  • When worn at night: Normally, compression stockings are worn during the day when your legs are at their slimmest and have not yet swelled. Unless your doctor has instructed you to wear them while you sleep, they are often removed before bed. Compression stockings may prevent blood flow by moving the blood away from your feet when you're lying down.

  • Compression levels are measured in mmHg and are too tight when worn (millimeters of mercury). The lowest, mildest level (8–15 mmHg) for people without a prescription is the safest. Higher compression levels (moderate 15-20 mmHg, firm 20-30 mmHg, and ultra-firm 30-40 mmHg) must be worn precisely as your vein specialist prescribes. Any benefits of wearing the stockings may be negated by wearing the incorrect compression level, and wearing too-tight stockings may further exacerbate your problem.

  • Wearing the wrong size - Compression stockings should be sized according to exact measurements of your ankles, knees, leg length, and more. Unevenly distributed and excess pressure may break the skin, especially in older, malnourished patients and those with thin and brittle skin.

  •  If the stockings are not put on smoothly, any creases can hurt the skin or obstruct circulation rather than assist. Once the toes are placed, stockings should be fully rolled down and back up the leg. Other tools make correctly putting on stockings easier (you can buy open-toed socks if your doctor recommends this instead of closed-toe socks). By keeping fingernails short and wearing special gloves to put the socks on and take them off, you can prevent generating runs or snags in the stockings.

Other complications may occur if you don't have the right and proper compression stockings:


  • Calluses and corns can form on the foot if the compression stockings are overly tight, leading to their development.
  • Lower limbs that are numb and tingly
  • Skin irritation, severe itching, and rashes
  • joint pain that is sudden and irrational, particularly in the knees
  • low blood flow
  • Pain
  • Legs, feet, and toes swelling
  • Legs, feet, and toes suddenly spasm 

You must professionally get your compression stockings fitted to avoid these problems.

1 comment

  • Would like to speak with a sales clerck.

    Joe Lech

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